21-09 Betsy 21-09

Age:
10 weeks Female

Please welcome a very special pup to foster care! Betsy is one of four blind Goldendoodle puppies surrendered to GRRIN. She is being fostered with one of her siblings in a home with another dog. All of the puppies have completely surprised the rescue team because they are highly adaptable and act like “normal” puppies in many ways, however they will need special adoptive homes. All four pups are working on house training, crate training, “nose” work, and walking on leash…and they are quite successful!

Betsy is spunky and more playful than her brother. She likes to wrestle and play more actively. She is vocal and likes to play with the youngest resident dog. She is not afraid to take a toy away from the her brother or bigger dog.

Charlie’s foster mom writes:

Charlie and Betsy may not be able to see, but that doesn’t make them much different than any other puppies!  They are curious, playful and adorable fluffy little pups.  These puppies respond best to sound, so clicker training, bells, clapping and calling to them work best. They know their names and generally come running when we call to them. They love chewing on anything they find, squeaky toys and air conditioning vents. They are sleeping through the night and are working on kennel and potty training. They know how to get to the door to go outside and where food/water dishes are. We have bells on our door to help encourage them to learn where to go.  As long as we don’t move things like furniture, they can navigate the foster home pretty easily. They have learned to sense when large objects are near and often slow down. They can go up and down the stairs to our backyard with very few tumbles. We take them out every 30 min and they go immediately and then explore or run around the backyard. 
We are working on sit (by offering a treat and touching their rear end) but they are so interested in everything around them, it’s hard to keep their attention.  They are very curious and unafraid of exploring. We have tried leash training but they need a couple more weeks before they are ready for that. 
Both are playing well with our resident dogs. They follow them everywhere outside. We would recommend blocking access to stairs and covering sharp corners until they get to know their home. They have learned when they sense something in front of them to put their heads down a little. They touch the object with the front of their head and determine what to do from there. 
Having a blind resident dog, I can say that once they learn their safe trails to the things they need, they are no different than other dogs. I would never go off leash unless in an enclosed space.

 

GRRIN is accepting adoption applications but will be very selective. If you think one of the pups might be a fit for your home, please consider:

  1. You must have a fenced yard with a gate that latches or locks.
  2. Your pup – even as an adult – will always need to be on leash when outside a fenced area.
  3. Children in an adoptive home must be older than six years old and we will observe interaction between the pups and children of all ages before approving adoption.
  4. We are not certain of future medical requirements so an adopting family will need to be prepared to provide medical care as their puppy matures and into adulthood.
  5. We believe each puppy will do best in a home with another dog and a family that is committed to continued training for their pup.

To begin the adoption process you must call our Goldline at 402-330-6680 and leave a voicemail. One of our volunteers will return your call and begin an adoption application. The next steps will include completing a detailed online questionnaire and having a volunteer visit your home.